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Omatsuri mambo – お祭りマンボ

asakusa sanjyamatsuri Other Specials
広告

Omatsuri mambo

Watashi no tonari no ojisan wa
Kanda no umare de chakichaki edokko
Omatsuri sawagi ga daisuki de
Nejiri hachimaki soroi no yukata
Ame ga furou ga yari ga furou ga
Asa kara ban made omikoshi katsuide
Wasshoi wasshoi
Wasshoi wasshoi
Keiki wo tsukero shio maite okure
Wasshoi wasshoi
Wasshoi wasshoi
Sore soresore omatsuri da

Ojisan ojisan taihen da
Dokoka de hansho ga natte iru
Kaji wa chikai yo suriban da
Nani wo ittemo wasshoi shoi
Nani wo kiitemo wasshoi shoi
Wasshoi wasshoi
Wasshoi wasshoi
Sore soresore omatsuri da

Sono mata tonari no obasan wa
Asakusa sodachi de choppiri bijin de
Omatsuri sawagi ga daisuki de
Iki na suashi ni shibori no yukata
Ame ga furou ga yari ga furou ga
Asa kara ban made okagura kenbutsu
Peehyara peehyara
Tentsuku tentsuku okame to oni ga
Hannya to hyottoko ga
Peehyara peehyara
Tentsuku tentsuku
Sore soresore omatsuri da

Obasan obasan taihen da
Ouchi wa rusu da yo karappo da
Kossori karasu ga neratteru
Nani wo ittemo peehyara hya
Nani wo kiitemo tentsuku tsu
Peehyara peehyara
Tentsuku tentsuku
Sore soresore omatsuri da

Omatsuri sunde hi ga kurete
Tsumetai kaze no fuku yoru wa
Ie wo yakareta ojisan to
Hesokuri torareta obasan no
Hon ni setsunai tameiki bakari
Ikura naitemo kaeranai
Ikura naitemo ato no matsuri yo

Lyricist & Composer:HARA Rokurou
in 1952

Omatsuri manbo

My friendly neighbor, the uncle
Was born in Kanda, a true Edokko
He loves the festival excitement
Wearing a twisted headband and matching yukata
Whether it rains or spears fall from the sky
From morning till night, he carries the mikoshi
Wasshoi wasshoi
Wasshoi wasshoi
Bring in the cheer, sprinkle the salt
Wasshoi wasshoi
Wasshoi wasshoi
Sore soresore, it’s the festival

Ojisan! Ojisan! There’s an emergency!
Somewhere the fire bell is ringing
The fire is close, it’s a fire watch
No matter what I say, wasshoi shoi
No matter what you hear, wasshoi shoi
Wasshoi wasshoi
Wasshoi wasshoi
Sore soresore, it’s the festival

My friendly neighbor, the auntie
Raised in Asakusa, a bit of a beauty
She loves the festival excitement
Barefoot in a stylish shibori yukata
Whether it rains or spears fall from the sky
From morning till night, watching the kagura dance
Peehyara peehyara
Tentsuku tentsuku,
With Okame and Oni, Hannya and Hyottoko
Peehyara peehyara
Tentsuku tentsuku
Sore soresore, it’s the festival

Obasan! Obasan! There’s an emergency!
The house is empty, no one is home
A thief is sneaking around
No matter what I say, peehyara hya
No matter what you hear, tentsuku tsu
Peehyara peehyara
Tentsuku tentsuku
Sore soresore, it’s the festival

After the festival is over and the day ends
On a cold, windy night
The uncle who lost his house to fire
And the auntie whose hidden savings were stolen
Let out truly heart-wrenching sighs
No matter how much they cry, it won’t come back
No matter how much they cry, it’s after the festival

Utasuky
Utasuky

“Omatsuri Mambo” by MISORA Hibari is a lively song that encapsulates the spirit of Japanese festivals and the common people’s tendency to get swept away by the excitement.

 

The song tells the story of two characters who immerse themselves in the festivities, ignoring warnings of impending troubles.

 

The old man, friendly neighbor, the uncle who called “Ojisan”, a Edokko (true Tokyoite), loves carrying the Omikoshi (portable shrine), while the lady, friendly neighbor, the uncle who called “Obasan”, from Asakusa enjoys watching the traditional kagura performances.

 

Despite being warned about a nearby fire and a sneak thief targeting their homes, they remain blissfully engrossed in the festival.

Kanda Matsuri 20230514b.jpg

Mikoshi photo by 江戸村のとくぞうOwn work, CC BY-SA 4.0, Link

 

As the song progresses, the rhythm and tone shift, reflecting a return to everyday life after the festival’s excitement.

 

The narrative culminates in the revelation of the old man’s house being burned down and the lady’s secret savings being stolen.

 

This outcome illustrates the Japanese idiom “ato no matsuri” (literally “after the festival”), which means realizing too late when nothing can be done and the situation is beyond retrieval.

 

It’s likely that HARA Rokurou, who both wrote and composed the song, drew inspiration from the idiom “Atono matsuri” (After the festival = Too late).

 

Nevertheless, the lyrics and the melody are both remarkable. It can truly be called a classic that will go down in history.

貴布禰神社貴布祢神社神楽猿田彦.jpg

Kagura photo by Kibune-shineOwn work, CC BY-SA 4.0, Link

 

The song beautifully contrasts the euphoria of the festival with the sobering aftermath, emphasizing the stark difference between the joyous celebration and the harsh reality that follows.

 

By using this idiom, the song comically depicts how the characters’ carefree indulgence in the festival leads to irreversible consequences.

 

This adds a humorous touch to the otherwise poignant message, capturing both the transient nature of happiness and the inevitable return to reality.

 

Incidentally, the term ‘Atono matsuri’ seems to have originated from the admonition that it is too late to go and see the Gion matsuri the day after it ends.

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▼Festivals from spring to summer are often large-scale events rooted in prayers for victories by powerful warlords or for the healing of epidemics. On the other hand, autumn festivals are usually more localized, focusing on giving thanks for the abundant harvests specific to each region.

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